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January 2018

The Numinous and the Natural

The Numinous and the Natural: Christianity and Environmentalism

The Tragedy of the Commons shows us that the destruction of the environment is an issue regarding not only how people relate to one another, but also how we relate to nature.

Jeffrey Poomkudy | The Dartmouth Apologia | Fall 2017
Race and or the Christian Identity

Race and/or the Christian Identity?

All Christians share a place in the intersectionality of faith and race, but these identities need not be subject to an “either-or” debate.

Abi Bernard | Cornell Claritas | Fall 2017
What is Justice

What is Justice?

If Jesus’ loving death on the cross becomes the Christian archetype of justice, our vision has more in common with Socrates’ than with Thrasymachus’ or Cephalus’.

Luke Foster | The Yale Logos | Spring 2016
N T Wright

Interview with N. T. Wright: The Reality of the Resurrection and the Mission of the Church

"If you believe that the evidence for the resurrection to be compelling, why do you think so many people nonetheless reject it?"

The Dartmouth Apologia Staff | The Dartmouth Apologia | Fall 2016
War and Peace in Christian Tradition

War and Peace in Christian Tradition

What are some wise insights and necessary points of reflection that we, Christian or not, should take heed of when confronted with violence, war and the question of justice?

Erik Johnson | MIT et Spiritus | Fall 2016
Interpreting Inspiration

Interpreting Inspiration: Linking God, Mankind, and the Written Word

Inspiration in a theological sense is not equivalent to the inspiration a musician or a painter might feel to produce art.

Matthew West | The Dartmouth Apologia | Fall 2015
Redeeming Rest

Redeeming Rest

With a more robust view of time, we can rest as well as work because both add qualitative value to our lives.

Elizabeth Schmucker | Cornell Claritas | Spring 2016

December 2017

Proving the Existence of God Defending Descartes Causal Argument

Proving the Existence of God: Defending Descartes’ Causal Argument

Descartes’ work offers an enlightening perspective on the commonly spouted claim that Christianity is a game of blindness.

Jessica Tong | The Dartmouth Apologia | Fall 2016
In Pursuit of Morality

In Pursuit of Morality

The indicative and imperative grammar moods convey the fundamental truth in Christianity that how a person becomes more moral is through the foundational work of God transforming the person.

Joshua Jeon | Cornell Claritas | Spring 2016
A Picture Not a Copy

A Picture Not a Copy: Gadamer Helps Us Honor Art (And Each Other)

At the beginning of Truth and Method Gadamer attempts to re­habilitate art as not merely an aesthet­ic experience, but as a genuine mode of knowing truth.

Michael Mullaney | The Wheaton Pub | Spring 2016
Reforming Insignificance in the Church

Reforming Insignificance in the Church

I realize that this type of culture does not predominate all Christian churches, but I do have to acknowledge that these types of communities exist, and I’ve been a victim of them.

Diana Lutfi | UC Berkeley TAUG | Spring 2016
Borrowing and Lending

Lending and Borrowing: A Christian Perspective

This paper will delve further into what the Bible has to say about lending and borrowing, how its interpretation has changed over time, and how it can work in today’s society.

Roy Walker | Swarthmore Peripateo | Spring 2016
Criminal is the Wrong Word

“Criminal” is the Wrong Word

Today, the United States of America represents 5% of the world’s population, but 22% of the world’s incarcerated population is in an American prison or jail.

Emani Pollard | Cornell Claritas | Spring 2016
Resting in the Land of the Lotus-Eaters

Resting in the Land of the Lotus-Eaters

We are able to fully understand and sympathize with the sailors’ situation because seeing their vulnerability, we unconsciously yet fundamentally acknowledge our own susceptibility to the same evil.

Eleanor Duan | UC Berkeley TAUG | Spring 2016
Metaphysics in the Poetry of W. B. Yeats and T. S. Eliot

Metaphysics in the Poetry of W. B. Yeats and T. S. Eliot

The question of the purpose of poetry as such is not simply academic or theoret­ical, but is grounded in understanding how poetry can and ought to relate to contemporary culture.

Nicholas Westberg | The Wheaton Pub | Spring 2016
The Strongest Argument Against Christianity

The Strongest Argument Against Christianity

I think that the strongest argument against Christianity can be made by comparing modern Christians with the Bible.

James Frederick | UC Berkeley TAUG | Spring 2016
Composing Liturgical Space

Composing Liturgical Space: A Design Thesis

What if there was a way to spatially communicate the progression of feelings we experience within the different parts of liturgy?

Matthew Barley | The Brown & RISD Cornerstone | Spring 2016
What Killed Robert Peace

What Killed Robert Peace?

Robert Peace’s short and tragic life comes as a shock because many of us assume that poverty can be eradicated with more money, more intellect, more opportunities, and so on

Esther Jiang | Cornell Claritas | Spring 2016

November 2017

Prayer, Relationship, and Depending on God

Prayer, Relationship, and Depending on God

For the longest time, I told myself that it was just a matter of personal choice, that some people felt more inclined to pray out loud than others, and that I shouldn’t be pressured to pray because doing it out of obligation would make my prayers forced and insincere.

Juhyae Kim | Swarthmore Peripateo | Spring 2016
Discerning Fact from Fiction

Discerning Fact from Fiction: Christianity’s Middle Eastern Heritage

First, the Western-Christian imagination has in many ways hijacked the Jesus story, and changed it into a distinctly Western narrative that deviates from the history and truth of the real biblical setting.

Sharidan Russell | The Dartmouth Apologia | Fall 2016
The Role of Han in Korean Christianity

The Role of Han in Korean Christianity

Unlike Rome with Catholicism and Germany with Protestantism, the root of Christian growth in Korea is not spiritual but cultural.

Joyce Lee | The Dartmouth Apologia | Fall 2016
More Than Money

More Than Money: Poverty As a Spiritual Problem

"And so poverty as a spiritual problem is what’s going on in the souls of the poor people, and the souls of the people who let poverty continue."

Olugbenga Joseph | The Brown & RISD Cornerstone | Spring 2016
Is the Church Inherently Conservative

Is the Church Inherently Conservative? 

I am not trying to decide once and for all if the church falls on the conservative side of the American political spectrum.

David Paiva | The Harvard Ichthus | Spring 2016
Review: The Global War of Christians

Review of The Global War on Christians

In the present day, the International Society for Human Rights estimates that 80% of all acts of religious persecution are perpetrated against Chris­tians.

Paul Escher | St Olaf Avodah | Spring 2015
Self, Society, and the Trinitarian Posture

Self, Society, and the Trinitarian Posture

The Christian understanding of human nature instead presents a picture that merges collectivism and individualism into one coherent whole.

Amanda Wang | The Dartmouth Apologia | Fall 2016
Examining the Synoptic Gospel Problem

Examining the Synoptic Gospel Problem

Although the Synoptic problem is usually put forth as a primarily literary problem, more recent advances in our knowledge of oral traditions have made scholars start to shift the emphasis given to the role of oral memory and traditions in their views of the Synoptic overlaps and differences.

Erik Johnson | MIT et Spiritus | Spring 2017
The Heart of Mental Health

The Heart of Mental Health

This, then, is the crux of the conception of mental health suggested by the Christian worldview: being mentally well is more than reducing a negative display of symptoms.

Jake Casale | The Dartmouth Apologia | Spring 2017
When in Doubt

When in Doubt: The New Testament’s Veracity

When we say the Bible is “God-inspired,” “God-breathed” or “God’s Word” what do we mean? If it does not contain Jesus’s words, is it God’s Word? Is the New Testament verbatim of God? I thought it was.

Kelsey Waddill | The Hopkins Dialectic | Spring 2017

October 2017

Myth Becomes Fact

“Myth Become Fact”

Throughout history, countless characters have arisen who speak or act in ways that remind one of Christ. In light of this, how could Christianity explain its ideas as unique and more legitimate than others?

Becky Bowman Saunders | St Olaf Avodah | Spring 2015
Created to Creator

Created to Creator

I encountered Gerard Manley Hopkins' poem “Pied Beauty” last fall, clasped in the pages of a green and white anthology. I immediately recognized its beauty; it is a playful thing, quick-witted and high-spirited.

Kate Massinger | The Harvard Ichthus | Spring 2016
The Hidden Life of Liturgical Chant in Rachmaninoffs Music

The Hidden Life of Liturgical Chant in Rachmaninoff’s Music

Rachmaninoff, always inspired by the elder Tchaikovsky, also decided to try his hand at liturgical music, but unlike most of his contemporaries, he found something very affecting about it, and after studying chant in depth, he composed a significant amount for the Church.

Ben Costello | The Hopkins Dialectic | Fall 2016
John Inazu

An Interview with Professor John Inazu

"Well, I think of pluralism in two ways: one is a descriptive fact about the world: we have deep and irresolvable differences between us, and so the question is, what do we do with them?"

Washington University in St. Louis Kairos Staff | Washington University in St. Louis Kairos | Fall 2017
Letting Law Go

Letting Law Go? A Lutheran Perspective on Law in “Frozen”

By analyzing Elsa’s changing understanding of law, as it relates to her moral duties to her kingdom and to her sister, we hope to show how Frozen can be interpreted through the paradigm of Luther’s conception of law.

Luke Shurson and Alexander Quanbeck | St Olaf Avodah | Spring 2015
The Vatican Billions

The Vatican Billions

How can the Church justify sitting on piles of cash while people around the world are living in poverty? When Her own founder said, “Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven” (Mk 10:21)?

Justin Sanchez | The Harvard Ichthus | Spring 2016
Boundary Lessons from Infants

Boundary Lessons From Infants

What happens when I am securely attached to God? I have the freedom to explore, like the securely attached infants who used their mothers as a base from which they explored the room.

Lisa Ann Yu | UC Berkeley TAUG | Spring 2016
Faithful Activism

Faithful Activism

These forms of resistance are a reflection of that most radical message of all—that each of us is loved and valued and worthy in the eyes of God. No exceptions.

Joyce Tompkins | Swarthmore Peripateo | Spring 2017
God Loves Hip-Hop

God Loves Hip-Hop

Hip-hop will never be a “perfect” platform for God’s message because humans will never be “perfect” vessels for God’s message, yet many of its musicians recognize their God-given blessings and brokenness and are excited to project them into the musical world.

Abigail Rogers-Berner | The Hopkins Dialectic | Spring 2017
Christian Traditions in a Chinese Looking Glass

Chinese Traditions in a Christian Looking Glass

I thought Christianity was the same story spoken by a different tongue: if you want this, you do as I say, and then you will have it.

Lina Tian | The Columbia Crown & Cross | Fall 2016
Spanish Mass at Harvard

Spanish Mass at Harvard

I imagine there are other bilingual students at Harvard who experience these same discouragements at worship services for other faiths. However, this investigation will focus particularly on the experience of Spanish-speaking Catholics.

Marina Spinelli | The Harvard Ichthus | Fall 2016
The Caring Approach

The Caring Approach

In showing compassion, sympathy and empathy through His miracles, Jesus also revolutionized the way we approach the sick by demonstrating how powerful these qualities are.

Tori Ranero | The Vanderbilt Synesis | Fall 2016

September 2017

A QandA with Gary Habermas

A Q&A with Gary Habermas

"The basic idea here is that because Jesus was buried in Jerusalem, and that this is also where the apostolic preaching began, critics would simply need to walk over to the tomb to determine whether it was empty, or whether it contained the corpse of a crucifixion victim."

Luke Dickens | The Dartmouth Apologia | Spring 2017
Boundaries

Boundaries

We invite you to look for the beauty that boundaries can create and to heal the wounds cut by divisive boundaries.

Laura Clark | UC Berkeley TAUG | Spring 2016
Porn is Not Private

Porn is Not Private: Why Viewing Pornography Perpetuates Injustice

If we have the social conscience to denounce the lies of sexual objectification or normalizing violence, we cannot let pornography get away with the same ideas.

Brandon Wright | The Harvard Ichthus | Spring 2016
The Theodicy of CS Lewis

The Theodicy of C.S. Lewis

Lewis’s defense of God’s goodness in the presence of evil rests heavily upon the belief that love given out of free will is more valuable than love given out of forced obedience.

Brian Klein | St Olaf Avodah | Spring 2015
John Calvin and the Case for Refugees

John Calvin and the Case for Refugees

Central to Calvin’s social policy was an intense devotion to the less fortunate in society. However they may present themselves, whether as orphans or widows or refugees, Calvin believed that he had a solemn and God-given duty to care for them.

Noah Black | The Vanderbilt Synesis | Fall 2016
The Weariness and Work of Sloth

The Weariness and Work of Sloth

Sloth is farther reaching, more insidious, and better at hiding than laziness, arising from a deep emptiness or lack, and can exhibit itself as laziness, but also, counter-intuitively, as excessive busyness.

John Nystrom | The Cornell Claritas | Spring 2017
Sanctuary and the Law

Sanctuary and the Law

Sanctuary existed as a strong legal tradition from the reign of Theodosius and throughout the medieval period in canon and English common law.

Megan Stater | The Columbia Crown & Cross | Fall 2016
Insights from Professor Chuck Huff

Insights from Professor Chuck Huff

"Do you have any particular examples from your classes where people have really thought through or wrestled with the issues of religion and science?"

Avodah Editorial Staff | St Olaf Avodah | Spring 2015
Black Families and Labor Markets in the Post-Reconstruction Era

Black Families and Labor Markets in the Post-Reconstruction Era

Failure to take the Black family on their own terms and in their own contexts has led many cultural critics to assign blame Black culture for the high pover­ty and single-motherhood rates that seem to afflict the poor Black community.

Michael Chen | The Wheaton Pub | Fall 2016
Politics: Where Do We Go From Here

Politics: Where Do We Go From Here?

At its root, politics is not even really about addressing the latest national controversy or advancing a particular agenda, but about bringing us together as citizens to do what we can’t do on our own.

Sam Elder | MIT et Spiritus | Fall 2016